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Search Results for: farmers

Safe Electricity Reminds Farmers To Keep Safety Top Of Mind

Large Equipment and Power Lines
For Release: April 18, 2016 Contact: Molly Hall, info@safeelectricity.org, 217-546-6815 SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – Farming is a dangerous job. In fact, the  U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers in the top 10 civilian occupations with high fatal work injury rates. One of the hazards faced by farm workers is contact with electrical equipment. Safe Electricity encourages farmers to keep safety top of mind this planting season. By doing some planning and following safety procedures, the risk of having an accident involving electricity can be greatly reduced. “One critical part of safety around electricity is awareness,” explains Kyla Kruse, communications director of the Safe Electricity program. “It’s important to remember that farm machinery is vulnerable to hitting power lines because of its large size, height, and extensions. Being aware of the location of overhead power lines and planning a safe equipment route can help reduce accidents.” In equipment with auto-guidance systems, less focus is needed on steering, which Read More

Farmers Urged to Look Up During Harvest Season

Combine and Power Lines
For Immediate Release Contact: Molly Hall, info@safeelectricity.org, 217-546-6815 The Importance of Remembering Electrical Safety (SPRINGFIELD, Ill.) — For farmers across the nation, harvest brings long grueling hours in the field. This can cause workers to be weary and prone to forget the safety precautions that can prevent serious or fatal electrical injuries.  Every year, an average 62 farm workers are electrocuted in the United States and many more are injured, according to Labor Department statistics. Safe Electricity urges farm operators, family members, and employees to beware of overhead power lines, to keep farm equipment safely away, and to know what to do if accidental contact is made with power lines. Safe Electricity urges all farm workers to visit www.SafeElectricity.org and watch the video story of farmer Jim Flach, who was fatally injured as he climbed down from his equipment that was in contact with overhead power lines. The increasing size of farm equipment, particularly grain tanks on combines that have Read More

Spring Field Preparation Includes Checking For Power Line Clearances

Power Lines and Storm Clouds
Many farmers are busy preparing tillage equipment, sprayers and planters for spring field work. Safe Electricity urges farmers to look for electric hazards around the farm as they prepare for planting. The most common cause of electric shocks is operating machinery such as large tractors with front loaders, portable grain augers, fold-up cultivators, moving grain elevators and any equipment with an antenna. Handling long items such as irrigation pipe, ladders and rods also pose the risk of contact with power lines. Getting too close to a power line while working is dangerous because electricity can arc, or “jump,” to conducting material or objects. Overhead power lines are necessary to deliver electricity to farmsteads and rural homes, but the electricity can be deadly if wires are touched by large equipment. Farmers should be aware of power lines while using large equipment for spring tillage. Farmers and their equipment should always be 10 feet away from power lines on all sides. Field cultivators Read More

Safe Electricity Shares Tips For A Safe Harvest

Combine and Power Lines
Contact: Molly Hall, info@safeelectricity.org, 217-546-6815 SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – During harvest season, many farmers reap the benefits of advancement in agricultural technology. With the help of GPS auto-steer devices, farmers are able to decrease driver error and maximize productivity. Yet despite these advances, safety risks remain. September 18-24 is National Farm Safety and Health Week, and to help farmers stay out of harm’s way, Safe Electricity shares tips for a safe harvest. GPS with auto-guidance provide farmers with real-time, accurate location data about a field, which can be used for crop planning, map making, navigation assistance, and machinery guidance. During harvest, this technology allows drivers to have their hands off the steering wheel as the combine maneuvers itself through the field. Thanks to this technology, farmers can more easily and efficiently maintain accuracy even during low light conditions, which enhances productivity. "One critical part of safety around electricity is awareness,” explains Molly Hall, executive director of the Safe Electricity program. “It’s important Read More

Don’t Put Safety On Autopilot

Farm Safety
Release Date: April 24, 2017 Contact: Molly Hall, info@safeelectricity.org, 217-546-6815 SPRINGFIELD, Ill. –Accuracy and consistency when planting make for impressive straight rows that also help maximize potential productivity. Global Positioning System (GPS) technology is helping farmers do just that. It can provide farmers with real-time, accurate location data about a field, which can be used for crop planning, map making, navigation assistance, and tractor guidance. While it can help with driver error, it does not mean that safety can be put on autopilot. Safe Electricity provides tips to help keep farm workers safe. GPS systems with auto-guidance allow drivers to have their hands off the steering wheel as the tractor maneuvers itself through the field. Thanks to this technology, farmers can more easily and efficiently maintain accuracy even during low light conditions, which enhances productivity. Despite continuing technological advancements in agriculture, the Bureau of Labor Statistics continue to list farming among the top ten civilian occupations with high fatal work Read More

Irrigation Equipment Safety

Irrigation
Know How to Stay Safe When Using Farm Irrigation Equipment Thousands of gallons of water are pumped through irrigation pipes daily. Eventually, all this water starts to clog the pipe with sediment. Raising the pipe in the air may seem like an obvious way to clean out an irrigation pipe. However, a long irrigation pipe could easily become tangled in irrigation pipes power lines, and you could get an electric shock as you become the electricity’s path to the ground. Irrigation systems are important to farms. However, they carry many risks that farmers should be aware of and know how to manage. Safe Electricity has the following information for farmers to keep in mind. Remember, water and electricity are a dangerous mix. Do not allow irrigation water nozzles to spray on power lines. A water stream hitting a power line could energize the entire system, creating a shock hazard to anyone nearby or in contact with the equipment. Take some Read More

Portable Welders: Necessary, But Dangerous On The Farm

Powerlines and Farm Equipment
On many farms they are essential to keep equipment working, but on other farms they are death lurking at the end of a frayed cable. Portable welders kept in good condition and used properly, keep important equipment usable, and keep a farm running. But many farmers and farm workers have not only suffered debilitating shocks, but electrocution from welding equipment that is not maintained and should have been replaced long ago. Safe Electricity, a program of the Energy Education Council, strongly urges farmers to keep welding equipment in good repair as a matter of course. A few summers ago, a Michigan farmer plugged in a welder to do repairs on a mower. The farmer used a 40-year-old welder with a broken off ground wire and had exposed wires in several areas. The mower became charged with electric energy from the welder, and the 43-year-old farmer was electrocuted. To avoid tragedies like this one, Safe Electricity recommends maintaining equipment and personal protective equipment. Grounding Read More

Safe Electricity Plants Seeds Of Caution Around Power Lines

Wind Turbine
As farmers make plans to return to their fields for spring planting, Safe Electricity urges farm workers to be particularly alert to the dangers of working near overhead power lines. Operating large equipment near these lines is one of the often overlooked, yet potentially deadly, hazards of working on a farm.   Start by making sure everyone knows to maintain a minimum 10-foot clearance from power lines. “The minimum 10 foot distance is a 360-degree rule—below, to the side, and above lines,” says Molly Hall, executive director of the Energy Education Council’s Safe Electricity program. “It can be difficult to estimate distance, and sometimes a power line is closer than it looks. A spotter or someone with a broader view can help.” Be aware of increased height when loading and transporting tractors on trailer beds. Many tractors are now equipped with radios and communications systems that have very tall antennas extending from the cab that could make contact with power Read More

Electrocution On The Farm

Powerlines and Farm Equipment
Farming is one of the most dangerous jobs in America. Sometimes on the farm, equipment that is normally helpful becomes lethal during an accident. Electricity is essential to the modern farmer, but can be deadly. Farmers should be aware of special safety precautions since they often use large equipment and ladders that put them close to overhead power lines. Safe Electricity has the following tips to keep you safe on the farm. Always lower a portable grain auger before you move it, even if only a few feet. Keep all objects at least 10 feet away from overhead lines. Know where all overhead power lines are located on your property and inform all workers about them. Plan your route between fields, to bins and elevators, and on public roads so that you avoid low-hanging power lines. If someone else transports large equipment, always specify a safe route and explain why certain routes must be taken. Be sure you and everyone Read More

Farm Safety & Health Week

Large Equipment and Power Lines
Farmers and farm family members face dangers every day.  Although tragedies such as tractor rollovers and grain bin suffocation receive the most attention, electrocution and electrical burn accidents are frequent on farms. Electrical safety is one of the priorities during National Farm Safety and Health Week, September 19-25. The simple movement of a portable grain auger from one bin to another can have tragic results if the individuals involved are not extremely careful. The use of tractors with large cabs and antennas and oversized grain wagons can also result in preventable electrocution incidents. Electrical equipment around fields, such as power lines in the end rows, may get overlooked during such a hectic time of year as harvest.  However, failure to notice overhead power lines can be a deadly oversight. Most farmsteads could use a very careful overhead visual inspection of electric lines. The service may no longer meet the proper height codes because of age and/or damage to poles and pole Read More